An Appeal to the Public on the Conduct of the Banks in the City of New-York.; [Since the Suspension of Specie Payments]. A CITIZEN OF NEW-YORK, Isaac BRONSON.

An Appeal to the Public on the Conduct of the Banks in the City of New-York.; [Since the Suspension of Specie Payments]

New York: New-York Courier, 1815.

21 pages, printed with text in double columns. Original pamphlet, sewn (dampstain at upper corner, and rough at edges but well inside the ample margins; some pages still un-opened). New York: At the Office of the New-York Courier, 1815. First edition. A very good copy of this exceedingly scarce pamphlet. OCLC lists only 13 copies, including those at Columbia, Cornell, Yale, Harvard, and the New York Historical Society.

Attributed to Isaac Bronson by F. Redlich in "The Molding of American Banking," 1868, volume 1, page 308. "Isaac Bronson was a highly successful financier of the Jacksonian era who was also one of the period's most original and influential banking theorists. Bronson accumulated his very considerable fortune in New York primarily by judicious personal money-lending operations on long-term bonds and mortgages at a cautious 7 per cent annual return, supplemented by successful ventures in land speculation. In addition to wealth, he had by the 1830's acquired a weighty reputation for sober financial conservatism and was regarded as an authoritative exponent of sound banking principles. Prominent in the financial community, he had long thrown his weight as a sound banking theorist against the "wild-cat" practices of the then rampant state banks." --Venit, A. (1945). The Journal of Economic History

Binding: Pamphlet
Edition: First
Language: English

Price: $3,750.00

Item #275647

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