A Map of the Country which was the Scene of Operations of the Northern Army; including Wilderness through which General Arnold marched to attack Quebec. John MARSHALL.

A Map of the Country which was the Scene of Operations of the Northern Army; including Wilderness through which General Arnold marched to attack Quebec.

Philadelphia: C. P. Wayne, 1807.

Map. Uncolored engraving. Sheet measures 10.75 x 9.5".

This scarce 1807 Revolutionary War-era map covers the regions of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Canada, depicting the scene of operations of the Northern Army. In particular, it highlights the wilderness route General Benedict Arnold took on his second expedition to attack Quebec City. The important Hudson Valley theater of war is also represented, including the strategic location of Fort Ticonderoga, which changed hands several times during the war. Other important scenes of battle, including Bennington, Saratoga, Still Water, Crown Point, Montreal, and Quebec are also identified. Topographical elements help to contextualize the armies' paths and describe the space between important locations such as Cape Ann, Lake Champlain, Lake George, the Connecticut River, St. Lawrence River, Kennebeck River, and Lake St. Peter.

The map was part of the rare 1807 atlas volume belonging to Chief Justice John Marshall's seminal six volume biography of Washington. In good condition with minor wear along original folds.

John James Marshall (1755--1835) was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. A renowned Federalist, Marshall's admiration for George Washington led him to publish "The Life of Washington," a five-volume biography of the famed President and general. In 1832, he produced a revised and condensed two-volume edition with hand-colored maps. This map attests both to Marshall's influential work and to the skill of the general it honors.

Binding: Unbound
Language: English

Price: $300.00

Item #274537