A Plan of the Country from Frog's Point to Croton River shewing the Positions of the American and British Armies from the 12th of October 1776 until the Engagement on the White Plains on the 28th. John MARSHALL.

A Plan of the Country from Frog's Point to Croton River shewing the Positions of the American and British Armies from the 12th of October 1776 until the Engagement on the White Plains on the 28th.

Philadelphia: C. P. Wayne, 1807.

Map. Uncolored engraving. Sheet measures 17.25 x 10".

This scarce 1807 Revolutionary War-era map extends from Harlem in Manhattan, New York City north as far as Croton-on-Hudson. Focusing on the strategic are on the west bank of the Hudson River, the map indicates the changing positions of the American and British armies from October 12 to 28, 1776 between Frog's Point to Croton River to eventually join the Battle of White Plains.

The British army forced Washington and his troops first across the Hudson, or North River, and then further into New Jersey: a string of seeming victories that would eventually lead to Washington's famous crossing of the Delaware at Valley Forge and his surprise attack in the Battle of Trenton.

To contextualize the armies' paths, the map shows rivers, roads, and topographical elements. The map was part of the rare 1807 atlas volume belonging to Chief Justice John Marshall's seminal six volume biography of Washington. In good condition with minor wear along original folds.

John James Marshall (1755--1835) was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. A renowned Federalist, Marshall's admiration for George Washington led him to publish "The Life of Washington," a five-volume biography of the famed President and general. In 1832, he produced a revised and condensed two-volume edition with hand-colored maps. This map attests both to Marshall's influential work and to the skill of the general it honors.

Binding: Unbound
Language: English

Price: $450.00

Item #274519