The Savoyard Girl


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Description: Stipple engraving. Image measures 17" x 13.5".

Comments: This beautiful stipple engraving of a girl playing a hurdy-gurdy beside a fireplace is modeled on William Hogarth's 1749 painting "The Savoyard Girl." This later print was made in 1798 and published in 1799. For many years, remained the only source of knowledge about Hogarth's painting, which remained in a private collection. The girl depicted is a savoyard, or a wandering street musician common in 18th-century London whose favorite instrument was the hurdy-gurdy, a stringed instrument with a crank and an onomatopoetic name. Sherlock's stipple engraving technique gives the print a lovely atmospheric quality that complements the girl's seemingly mournful song. The print is in good condition, with narrow margins and some wear to the corners, not affecting the image. It remains both a lovely document of art history and a work of art in its own right.

Language: English
Type: Prints

Book ID: 234828

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By This Author: SHERLOCK, George
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Dear Argosy - you've made my day - my order (Netherlands at War, 1940-1945) arrived on my doorstep this morning unheralded and very, very welcome. My sisters and I are Dutch immigrants in New Zealand and we all lived through that war 60 plus years ago as young kids. We had occasion to share what we remembered recently - and now you've supplied the book. I can't tell you what this means... - Dorothea B.
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